Biopure submits IND for trial in patients with acute myeloid leukemia



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Biopure Corporation has announced that it has submitted to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) an investigational new drug (IND) application to conduct a pilot phase 2 clinical trial of the company’s oxygen therapeutic Hemopure [hemoglobin glutamer - 250 (bovine)].

In the proposed trial Hemopure would be studied for use in the treatment of life-threatening anemia secondary to induction chemotherapy in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who refuse red blood cell transfusion.

As previously reported, the company met with the FDA in July 2008 to discuss an acceptable patient population for a new clinical trial. At that time the company proposed a trial in AML patients who will not accept blood transfusions and consequently are unable to undergo potentially life-saving induction chemotherapy because of the profound anemia the chemotherapy causes. The purpose of the proposed study would be to study the efficacy of Hemopure in delivering oxygen in the absence of red blood cell transfusion. An effective treatment for this patient population represents an unmet medical need because of an expected 100% mortality within several months without induction chemotherapy.

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