Discovery of novel prion infectivity in white and brown fat tissues of mice



Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have successfully induced human insulin-producing cells, known as beta cells, to replicate robustly in a living animal, as well as in the lab. The discovery not only could improve models and methods for studying diabetes, but also opens up new possibilities for treating the condition. “Most

Full Post: Important discovery in human insulin-producing cells

Researchers from the National Institutes of Health and the Scripps Research Institute have found novel prion infectivity in white and brown fat tissues of mice.

The study appears December 5 in the open-access journal PLoS Pathogens.

Prion diseases, also known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, are infectious progressive fatal neurodegenerative diseases which affect humans as well as wild and domestic animals. Distribution of prion infectivity in organs and tissues is important in understanding prion disease pathogenesis and designing strategies to prevent prion infection in animals and humans.

Previous studies in animals including sheep, goats, cattle, deer, mink, hamsters and mice, have found prion infectivity mostly in nervous system tissues such as the brain and spinal cord. The tissues studied here in a mouse model demonstrate a proof of principle that white and brown fat tissues are sites of prion agent deposition and therefore may play a previously unrecognized role in prion infectivity and transmission of prion disease.

The authors state clearly that it will be important to extend their studies to prion-infected large animals, such as cattle, sheep, deer, and elk where they may be potential sources of contamination of human and domestic animal food chains. Results of the current and future studies may merit additional consideration of steps to eliminate from the food chain any fat from ruminants suspected of exposure to or infection with prions.

http://www.plos.org/

Link




A worldwide group of scientists has created an infectious prion disease in a mouse model, in a step that may help unravel the mystery of this progressive disease that affects the nervous system in humans and animals. The research team, including Christina J. Sigurdson, D.V.M., Ph.D., assistant professor of pathology at the University of California,

Full Post: Scientists create infectious prion disease in mouse model



Mice exposed to low temperatures develop more blood vessels in their adipose tissue and metabolise body fat more quickly, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet. Scientists now hope to learn how to control blood vessel development in humans in order to combat obesity and diabetes. The growth of fat cells and their metabolism

Full Post: Control of blood vessels a possible weapon against obesity



Cattle and sheep grazed on natural grasslands help maintain biodiversity and produce tastier, healthier meat, according to a study funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). The research, part of the Rural Economy and Land Use (RELU) programme which draws together the social and natural science, concluded that pasture-based farming is good for

Full Post: Pasture-based farming passes the taste test and is healthier too



Researchers at North Carolina State University and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have produced the first link between a species of bacteria most commonly found in sheep and human illness. Dr. Edward Breitschwerdt, professor of internal medicine at NC State’s College of Veterinary Medicine, and NC State colleague Dr. Ricardo Maggi isolated the

Full Post: Discovery of new bartonella species that infects humans



Most successful vaccines and drugs rely on protecting humans or animals by blocking certain bacteria from growing in their systems. But, a new theory actually hopes to take stopping infectious diseases such as West Nile virus and Malaria to the next level by disabling insects from transmitting these viruses. Research to be presented at the

Full Post: New vaccine theory aimed at ticks and mosquitoes to prevent disease transmission