Epeius Biotechnologies awarded European patents for targeted genetic anti-cancer medicine



Duke University and United States Army scientists have found that a cheap and nontoxic sunburn and diaper rash preventative can be made to produce brilliant light best suited to the human eye. Duke adjunct physics professor Henry Everitt, chemistry professor Jie Liu and their graduate student John Foreman have discovered that adding sulfur to ultra-fine

Full Post: Scientists coax bright white light from zinc oxide

Epeius Biotechnologies Corporation has received two additional European patents for the platform targeting technologies and molecular designs that enable precision gene delivery to primary cancers and metastatic lesions that have spread throughout the body.

With profound demonstrations of clinical benefit and single-agent-efficacy, as well as overall safety, Epeius Biotech continues to lead the field of clinical gene medicine with the advent of pathotropic (or disease-seeking) targeting. These latest EU patents follow on the heels of a major clinical patent that was recently awarded in the USA for targeted gene delivery in vivo. Together these clinical patents provide additional intellectual property protection for the platform of highly advanced biotechnologies embodied in the company’s leading anti-cancer agent Rexin-G — the first and so far only tumor-targeted gene delivery system that has been successfully validated in the clinic.

Based on recent breakthroughs in tumor-targeting and nanotechnology, a new generation of powerful biological anti-cancer agents that are exceedingly precise and highly selective for diseased tissues is currently in clinical development. Anti-cancer agents such as Rexin-G can be delivered by simple intravenous infusion, yet are programmed to seek-out and accumulate selectively in primary and metastatic lesions that have spread throughout the body, delivering a tumor-killing gene while sparing normal cells and tissues. Representing the world’s first targeted genetic medicine proven to be both safe and effective in the clinic, Rexin-G is commercially available in the Philippines — for use in all solid tumors that are refractory to standard chemotherapy — and is currently in clinical trials in the USA for several types of cancer.

http://www.epeiusbiotech.com/

Link




Epeius Biotechnologies announced today the results of Phase I/II and II studies of Rexin-G in chemotherapy-resistant metastatic soft tissue sarcoma and osteosarcoma, as presented by Dr. Sant P. Chawla, principal investigator, at the CTOS 14th annual meetings held in London UK on November 13-15, 2008. Patients received repeated infusions of Rexin-G i.v. over a period

Full Post: Epeius Biotechnologies announces results of Rexin-G in chem-resistant metastatic soft tissue sarcoma and osteosarcoma



Research has shown that a particular receptor for the blood protein thrombin is overexpressed by highly metastatic melanoma cells. When activated, this receptor triggers a wide range of biochemical changes that increase the metastatic activity of melanoma cells. To prevent those biochemical changes from occurring, a team of investigators at The University of Texas

Full Post: Nanoparticle targets melanoma with siRNA



Working with a nanoparticle designed to target and image glioblastoma, a form of brain cancer, investigators at the University of Washington in Seattle have found that these same nanoparticles inhibit tumor cell invasion, one of the key events that leads to the metastatic spread of cancer. The investigators have also determined how the nanoparticles exert

Full Post: Toxin-nanoparticle combo inhibits brain cancer invasion while imaging tumors



Given that cancer is a disease caused by gene mutations, cancer researchers have been striving to develop gene therapies aimed at correcting these mutations. However, these efforts have been hobbled by the difficulty in safely and efficiently delivering anticancer genes to tumors. Nanoparticles, however, may solve these delivery issues, and two recently published studies, using

Full Post: Targeted nanoparticles deliver therapeutic DNA to cancer cells



Peregrine Pharmaceuticals, Inc. has announced that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has issued U.S. Patent Number No. 7,455,833, which includes broad claims covering anti-viral applications of antibodies that directly bind to aminophospholipids. The aminophospholipid family of phospholipids, including phosphatidylserine (PS), represents a novel target for anti-viral therapies. The new patent follows publication this week

Full Post: Peregrine Pharmaceuticals awarded U.S. patent for anti-viral applications of phospholipid-targeting antibodies