Researchers look at relationship between spirituality, religiousness and happiness in children



A new clinical trial suggests that long-term use of candesartan, a drug currently used to treat hypertension, may significantly reduce the symptoms of genetic heart disease. The related report by Penicka et al, “The effects of candesartan on left ventricular hypertrophy and function in non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a pilot, randomized study,” appears in the January

Full Post: Candesartan shown to be safe new therapy for genetic heart disease

To make children happier, we may need to encourage them to develop a strong sense of personal worth, according to Dr. Mark Holder from the University of British Columbia in Canada and his colleagues Dr. Ben Coleman and Judi Wallace.

Their research shows that children who feel that their lives have meaning and value and who develop deep, quality relationships - both measures of spirituality - are happier. It would appear, however, that their religious practices have little effect on their happiness. These findings have been published in the online edition of Springer’s Journal of Happiness Studies.

Both spirituality (an inner belief system that a person relies on for strength and comfort) and religiousness (institutional religious rituals, practices and beliefs) have been linked to increased happiness in adults and adolescents. In contrast, very little work has been done on younger children. In an effort to identify strategies to increase children’s happiness, Holder and colleagues set out to better understand the nature of the relationship between spirituality, religiousness and happiness in children aged 8 to 12 years. A total of 320 children, from four public schools and two faith-based schools, completed six different questionnaires to rate their happiness, their spirituality, their religiousness and their temperament. Parents were also asked to rate their child’s happiness and temperament.

The authors found that those children who said they were more spiritual were happier. In particular, the personal (i.e. meaning and value in one’s own life) and communal (i.e. quality and depth of inter-personal relationships) aspects of spirituality were strong predictors of children’s happiness. Spirituality explained up to 27 percent of the differences in happiness levels amongst children.

A child’s temperament was also an important predictor of happiness. In particular, happier children were more sociable and less shy. The relationship between spirituality and happiness remained strong, even when the authors took temperament into account. However, counter intuitively, religious practices - including attending church, praying and meditating - had little effect on a child’s happiness.

According to the authors, “enhancing personal meaning may be a key factor in the relation between spirituality and happiness.” They suggest that strategies aimed at increasing personal meaning in children - such as expressing kindness towards others and recording these acts of kindness, as well as acts of altruism and volunteering - may help to make children happier.

http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=104910

Link




There are many people who do not believe in god and do not follow any religion. In fact the trend of people who do not follow religion is growing rapidly. Earlier it was only the youth who turned atheist in their prime time and later on turned out to be devout Christian after marriage and

Full Post: Do You Believe In God



Children’s academic progress could be being hindered by the stark differences between the way child-care centres, preschools and schools manage behaviour, according to a new study from the University of Sydney. An analysis of policy documents from 40 child-care centres, preschools and schools in Sydney found a sharp shift from the more positive approach of

Full Post: Kindergarten of hard knocks could be harming kids



A study published by researchers at Yeshiva University and its medical school, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, strongly suggests that regular attendance at religious services reduces the risk of death by approximately 20 percent. The findings, published in Psychology and Health, were based on data drawn from participants who spanned numerous religious denominations. The research

Full Post: Regular religious service attendance reduces risk of death by 20 percent



Happiness really does rub off - a person’s happiness depends on the happiness of others with whom they are connected, finds research published on bmj.com. Happiness is not just an individual experience or choice, but is dependent on the happiness of others to whom individuals are connected directly and indirectly, and requires close proximity to

Full Post: Happiness really does rub off



With childhood obesity increasing, school administrators and public health officials are reducing availability of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) in schools. In a study published in the November/December 2008 issue of the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, researchers found that reduction or elimination of SSB from school menus has little effect on total consumption by adolescents.

Full Post: Elimination of sugar-sweetened beverages from school menus shown not to affect total consumption by adolescents