Yale researchers find molecule that may help regulate how much animals and people eat



Forty-four percent of U.S. firefighters who died on duty in 2007 succumbed to a heart attack, based on data from the U.S. Fire Administration. That figure is twice the number of cardiovascular deaths among on-duty police officers. Despite the high incidence of death among these important protectors of society, no recording of the electrical activity

Full Post: Most frequent cause of death among firefighters is not flames, it’s their hearts

In the battle against obesity, Yale University researchers may have discovered a new weapon - a naturally occurring molecule secreted by the gut that makes rats and mice less hungry after fatty meals.

The findings are published in the Nov. 26 issue of the journal Cell .

The report suggests the molecule may help regulate how much animals and people eat, according to the team headed by Gerald I. Shulman, Yale professor of medicine and cellular & molecular physiology and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator.

Shulman’s team studied a family of lipids called N-acylphosphatidylethanolamines, or NAPEs, which are synthesized and secreted into the blood by the small intestine after fatty foods are eaten. The team found that mice and rats injected regularly with NAPEs ate less food and lost weight. In addition, treatment with NAPEs appeared to reduce the activity of “hunger” neurons in the brain while stimulating activity in neurons that are believed to play a role in reducing appetite.

In the last two decades, scientists have made great inroads toward understanding how the body communicates with the brain to control food intake. So far, hormones such as leptin that act as regulators of this complex system have proved disappointing when tested as potential weight-loss treatments in humans.

The researchers are now planning to investigate how the findings in the Cell paper apply to humans. They will first study non-human primates to determine if NAPE concentrations increase in a similar fashion after fat ingestion. Then, says Shulman, “If chronic NAPE treatment is well tolerated and can cause weight loss by a reduction of food intake, we would have strong impetus to move forward with human NAPE trials.”

http://www.yale.edu/

Link




As you gorge on food this holiday season, you might not want to think about the fat content of all the goodies you’ve indulged in. Nevertheless, your brain will be keeping tabs directly, suggests a report in the November 26th issue of the journal Cell, a Cell Press publication. Researchers have discovered in studies of

Full Post: Researchers discover that a lipid produced in the gut rises after eating fatty foods



Researchers have identified a molecule that tells your brain your stomach is full - signaling that it’s time to say no to a second piece of pumpkin pie and push back from the Thanksgiving table. In studies with mice and rats, researchers have found that a chemical messenger called NAPE is made in the small

Full Post: Researchers identify molecule that tells your brain your stomach is full



Obesity gradually numbs the taste sensation of rats to sweet foods and drives them to consume larger and ever-sweeter meals, according to neuroscientists. Findings from the Penn State study could uncover a critical link between taste and body weight, and reveal how flab hooks the brain on sugary food. “When you have a reduced sensitivity

Full Post: Researchers uncover a critical link between taste and body weight



Genetic mouse models have provided surprising insight into mechanisms linking serotoninergic compounds with the regulation of feeding behavior and body weight. The research, published by Cell Press in the November 26th issue of the journal Neuron , pinpoints a specific group of brain cells that mediate energy balance and may lead to the development of

Full Post: Discovery of mechanism linking serotonin with regulation of food intake



Once hailed as a miracle weight-loss drug, Fen-phen was removed from the market more than a decade ago for inducing life-threatening side effects, including heart valve lesions. Scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center are trying to understand how Fen-phen behaves in the brain in order to develop safer anti-obesity drugs with fewer side effects.

Full Post: Researchers find clue to safer obesity drugs