Adolescents with arthritis need more information when transitioning to adult care



Fitch Ratings has affirmed Merck & Co.’s (Merck) ratings, and revised the Rating Outlook to Negative from Stable. The ratings affirmed are: Long-term Issuer Default Rating (IDR) at ‘AA-’; Senior unsecured debt rating at ‘AA-’; Bank loan rating at ‘AA-’; Short-term IDR at ‘F1+’. The ratings apply to approximately $6.93 billion of outstanding

Full Post: Fitch Ratings revises Merck & Co.’s outlook

Helping adolescents with arthritis develop the skills and secure resources to assure that their health care needs are met as they transition to adulthood is an important issue in the U.S. In general, the frequency of which young people with special health care needs receive transition services is low and, to date, no studies have examined this frequency.

A new study examined the extent to which adolescents with arthritis receive transition services and compared these rates to youth with other special care health needs. The study was published in the January issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Led by Peter Scal of the University of Minnesota, researchers used information from the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs to identify adolescents aged 12 to 17 who had arthritis and to assess responses to questions about the transition to adulthood and adult-oriented health care.

The results showed that nearly three-quarters of adolescents with arthritis were encouraged to take responsibility for their health care needs and about half discussed how their needs might change when they became an adult. Only one in five, however, received counseling about the need to transfer to adult-oriented physicians and how to obtain health insurance as an adult. These results were similar to young people with special health care needs nationally, but lag behind those with diabetes.

“Health care transition is a complex set of tasks that are embedded within a complex developmental period and a complex heath care system,” the authors note. “It is not surprising, then, than the development and evaluation of services to facilitate health care transition has been slow.” However, a systematic approach to this problem can show results.

In the UK, for example, the British Society of Paediatric and Adolescent Rheumatology has developed a comprehensive health care transition program for youth with arthritis that appears to have a positive impact.

In the U.S., there seems to be much room for improvement is assisting adolescents with arthritis in achieving a successful health care transition into adulthood. “More research is needed to understand youth’s perspectives regarding their health care transition needs that should include items related specifically to health care transition, as well as how health care transition needs intersect with social, educational, and vocational concerns,” the authors conclude.

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/77005015/home

Link




African-Americans are much less likely to smoke than whites are during their teens. However, a new study finds that most of this advantage disappears by mid-adulthood. “There is a puzzle here in that usually the health disadvantages in African-Americans show up early in life and get worse as they get older,” says Fred Pampel, Ph.D.,

Full Post: Racial convergence in cigarette use from adolescence to the mid-thirties



For the first time, researchers have established a clear link between family rejection of lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) adolescents and negative health outcomes in early adulthood. The findings will be published in the January issue of Pediatrics , the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, in a peer-reviewed article entitled “Family Rejection as

Full Post: Family rejection of lesbian, gay and bisexual children linked to poor health in early childhood



A ban on fast food advertisements in the United States could reduce the number of overweight children by as much as 18 percent, according to a new study being published this month in the Journal of Law and Economics. The study also reports that eliminating the tax deductibility associated with television advertising would result in

Full Post: Banning fast food ads on TV would reverse childhood obesity trends



Obesity continues to increase for women in the United States, particularly among African-American and Mexican-American women. Between the ages of 35-44, there are approximately 3.3 million white women, 1.4 million African-American women, and 575,000 Mexican-American women who are obese. A new study published in the journal Public Health Nursing reveals that there is an increased

Full Post: Economic status affects obesity rates in Mexican-American and white women



A booster vaccination for parents of new babies and other household members may be the most effective way of preventing the fatal form of whooping cough in young infants, say a group of paediatric intensive care doctors on bmj.com. Whooping cough (pertussis) is a distressing infectious disease which affects infants and young children. Vaccination is

Full Post: Parents of new babies should be considered for a whooping cough booster, say experts