Blood levels of resistin a new biomarker for heart failure



Targanta Therapeutics Corporation announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has posted on its website briefing documents for the November 19, 2008 Anti-Infective Drugs Advisory Committee (AIDAC) meeting. AIDAC will review Targanta’s New Drug Application (NDA) for oritavancin for the treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infection (cSSSI) caused by gram-positive

Full Post: Targanta Therapeutics announces posting of briefing documents for review of FDA

Blood levels of resistin, a hormone produced by fat cells, can independently predict an individual’s risk of heart failure, cardiologists at Emory University School of Medicine have found.

Their findings were presented Nov. 12 at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions conference in New Orleans.

“This is one of the strongest predictors of new-onset heart failure we’ve been able to find, and it holds up even when you control for other biomarkers and risk factors including high blood pressure and diabetes,” says Javed Butler, MD, MPH, associate professor of medicine and director of heart failure research at Emory University School of Medicine.

The finding comes out of the Health ABC (Aging and Body Composition) study, sponsored by the National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health. The Health ABC study followed 3000 elderly people in the Pittsburgh and Memphis areas over seven years starting in 1998.

Although scientists don’t know the exact function of resistin, it appears to be associated with both inflammation and insulin resistance, says Vasiliki Georgiopoulou, MD, a post-doctoral research fellow with Butler who presented these findings. “Recent laboratory studies have also shown that resistin decreases the ability of rats’ heart muscles to contract,” she adds.

In the Health ABC study, the risk of new onset heart failure increased by 38 percent for every 10 nanograms per milliliter increase in resistin levels in blood. Resistin was a stronger predictor of heart failure risk than other inflammatory markers linked to heart disease, such as C-reactive protein, the researchers found.

“Considering the increasing number of people who are obese or have diabetes, very many of them are going to be at some level of risk for heart failure later in life,” Butler says. “The value of a marker such as resistin may be in accurately identifying among this large population of at-risk individuals who is at the highest risk and then targeting interventions to those people.”




Researchers at the University of Kentucky found that patients who had negative thinking patterns, such as thoughts about not being able to justify their own existence, were at higher risk for developing depression. Heart patients with depression have been shown to have more complications, including a higher risk of death. Rebecca Dekker, a research nurse,

Full Post: Negative thinking may play a bigger role in heart failure than previously thought



Heart failure is reaching epidemic levels among seniors in the United States, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2008. “Both the number of patients hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of heart failure and age-adjusted hospitalization rates for heart failure have increased dramatically over the past 27 years,” said Longjian Liu,

Full Post: Heart failure hospitalization rates rise among nation’s seniors



Adults with severe heart failure see almost three times as many Medicare providers each year compared to a typical beneficiary, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2008. An analysis conducted by researchers at the University of Colorado and Scios, Inc. showed that: Adults with severe heart failure see an

Full Post: Adults with severe heart failure have more doctor visits, medications than others on Medicare



In recent years, women, particularly younger women, experienced larger improvements in hospital mortality after myocardial infarction than men, according to a new study. Over the last decade some studies showed that younger women, but not older ones, are more likely to die in the hospital after MI than age-matched men. A team of researchers led

Full Post: Sex differences narrow in death after heart attack



Individuals who have persistent high blood pressure are at increased risks of a number of serious medical conditions, including heart failure. One of the factors that contributes to such heart failure is thickening of the muscle wall of the heart. Such thickening (known as hypertrophy) is a compensatory response of the heart to the high

Full Post: Molecular insight into how a heart failure drug in clinical trials works