Cytori reports benefit of adipose-derived regenerative cells in spinal disc model



Tufts researchers and colleagues report that place of birth plays a role in the occurrence of asthma in a United States black population. The researchers found that within one inner-city population, blacks born in the United States were more likely to have asthma than blacks who were born outside of the United States. “Within Asian

Full Post: Place of birth plays a role in the occurrence of asthma in U.S black population

Cytori Therapeutics, Inc. reported preclinical study results, which demonstrate the potential benefit of adipose-derived stem and regenerative cells (ADRCs) for the treatment of damaged intervertebral discs, evidenced by significantly increased disc tissue density and disc-specific extracellular matrix components at 12-months post treatment in a large animal model.

The data were presented today at the 2008 Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine International Society meeting.

This study demonstrates the potential of a patient’s own ADRCs to repair the spinal disc. While this study relied upon the traditional glassware methodology for ADRC isolation, the Celution System could increase the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of the procedure. The Celution? System is an automated, bedside device that isolates autologous ADRCs in a real-time fashion, thus representing a potential novel therapeutic for more than 300,000 patients undergoing spinal surgery annually.

12 months following treatment, discs that received ADRCs in hyaluronic acid (HA) carrier compared to discs treated with HA only demonstrated significantly greater levels of the disc specific extracellular matrix proteins, aggrecan and type II collagen. Viable ADRCs were identified within the discs by histological examination identifying a potential link between the durability of these transplanted cells and improved condition of the discs. “This histologic data shows that ADRCs may contribute to the regeneration of the spinal disc and form a healthier, more natural inner-disc space than HA alone,” said Jörg Meisel, M.D., Ph.D., the Director of Neurosurgery at the Bergmannstrost Klinik in Germany.”

In addition, in this preclinical study at 12 months post therapy, injured discs that were treated with ADRCs in HA showed significantly greater disc density. This finding is based on independent assessments of T2 weighted MRI, compared to injured discs that received no treatment.

As part of the study design, 12 large animals (6 for each time point), underwent injury of three lumbar discs. Six weeks following the injury, the three discs were randomly assigned to receive autologous ADRCs suspended in HA, HA only (control) or no treatment. The discs were then assessed at 6 and 12 months after treatment for matrix hydration and morphology, which both showed significant improvement in the ADRC treated discs. All ADRC treatments were well tolerated, evidenced by the lack of inflammation within the disc space. The reported results are a subset of top-line findings which will be reported in full in the Spring of 2009.

http://www.cytoritx.com/

Link




Osteotech, Inc. announced today that it has initiated a pivotal clinical trial for its DuraTech BioRegeneration Matrix. The first five patients in this 60-patient trial have already been enrolled. During the study’s initial cranial surgical procedures, the patients’ dura mater (the tough, outermost membrane surrounding the brain and spinal cord) was successfully repaired by surgeons

Full Post: Osteotech starts trial for DuraTech BioRegeneration Matrix



Cells from the human nose are showing further promise in remediating spinal cord injury, according to research from the University of New South Wales (UNSW). Six weeks after injecting cells from the human nose (olfactory ensheathing glia) into the injured spinal cords of rats, the researchers found improvements in the animals’ movement. “We

Full Post: Winning by a nose: promising news for spinal cord injury patients



A study published in the current issue of Cell Transplantation (Vol.17, No. suggests that mature adipocytes - fat cells - could become a source for cell replacement therapy to treat central nervous system disorders. According to the study’s lead researcher, Dr. Yuki Ohta of the Institute of Medical Science, St. Mariana University School of

Full Post: Transplanted fat cells restore function after spinal cord injury



Scientists at Burnham Institute for Medical Research (Burnham) have determined the structure of the interactions between proteins that form the heart of the death inducing signaling complex (DISC), which is responsible for triggering apoptosis (programmed cell death). The research, performed by Stefan Riedl, Ph.D., and colleagues, published online on Dec. 31 in the journal Nature

Full Post: Discovery of ‘on switch’ for cell death signaling mechanism



According to Australian scientists help for spine injury victims could be just a sniff away - researchers from the University of New South Wales in Sydney say stem cells taken from the nose could help spinal injury victims regain movement. The team have conducted tests on paralysed rats which found they were able to

Full Post: Help for spine injury victims could be just a sniff away