Genetic variations in DNA repair patterns may increase risk of pancreatic cancer



Roche NimbleGen, Inc. has launched NimbleGen Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) microarrays in a 12×135K format for analysis of DNA copy number variation. NimbleGen CGH 12×135K arrays allow simultaneous analysis of 12 independent sample pairs on a single microarray slide, each with 135,000 empirically tested long oligonucleotide probes. This new array format will enable rapid and

Full Post: Roche NimbleGen launches microarrays for analysis of DNA copy number variation

Genetic variations in DNA repair patterns may increase risk of pancreatic cancer by as much as threefold or decrease it by as much as 77 percent, depending on the genes involved, according to a report published in the January 15, 2009, issue of Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Pancreatic cancer is often identified in late stages, and thus is resistant to most available therapies. Scientists like Donghui Li, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, are working to determine genetic profiles that can be used in identifying high-risk individuals for the purpose of prevention and early detection of this disease.

“Our study provides some preliminary data on one pattern of genetic variations that may be useful in determining risk,” said Li, who is the lead author on the Clinical Cancer Research paper. “However, we still need to be cautious. As with any science, the key is replication, and the results of this study need to be confirmed by others.”

Li and colleagues analyzed nine single nucleotide polymorphisms of seven DNA repair genes among 734 patients with pancreatic cancer and 780 people without cancer. DNA repair is the guardian of the genome. When DNA repair failed to fix the DNA damages caused by exogenous agents such as tobacco carcinogens or endogenous agents such as reactive oxygen species, there is an increased chance of getting cancer.

Researchers found that the presence of a homozygous mutant genotype of LIG3 G-39A was associated with a 77 percent reduction in the risk of pancreatic cancer. By contrast, the presence of the gene ATM D1853N was associated with a nearly threefold (255 percent) increased risk of pancreatic cancer.

Currently, there is no approved genetic screening tool for pancreatic cancer, Li said.

http://www.aacr.org/

Link




Abnormalities in genes that repair mistakes in DNA replication may help identify people who are at high risk of developing pancreatic cancer, a research team from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center reports in the Jan. 15 issue of Clinical Cancer Research. Defects in these critical DNA repair genes may act alone

Full Post: Defects in critical DNA repair genes may predict pancreatic cancer risk



Variations in mismatch repair genes can help predict treatment response and prognosis in patients with pancreatic cancer, according to research from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center presented today in advance of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium. In the study, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved

Full Post: Variations in mismatch repair genes predict prognosis in pancreatic cancer



The brain’s serotonergic system plays an important role in alcohol preference and consumption. New findings show that specific DNA sequence variations of the serotonin transporter gene can influence drinking intensity among alcohol-dependent individuals. The brain’s serotonergic system plays an important role in alcohol preference and consumption. The serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4), in particular, may regulate

Full Post: DNA variations of serotonin transporter gene can influence drinking intensity



Variants of numerous DNA repair genes initially appeared to be statistically significantly associated with cancer risk in epidemiological studies. When the data from individual studies are pooled, however, few DNA repair gene variants appear truly associated with increased cancer risk, according to a field synopsis published in the December 30 online issue of the Journal

Full Post: Few DNA repair gene variants associated with increased cancer risk



Common genetic polymorphisms induce major differentiations in the metabolic make-up of the human population, according to a paper published November 28 in the open-access journal PLoS Genetics. An international team of researchers, led by Karsten Suhre, has conducted a genome-wide association study with metabolomics, identifying genetic variants in genes involved in the breakdown of fats.

Full Post: Study identifies genetic variants giving rise to differences in metabolism