Increased blood pressure in older adults affects cognitive functioning



MorphoSys AG and Galapagos NV announced today the launch of a long term co-development alliance aimed at discovering and developing antibody therapies based on novel modes of action in bone and joint disease, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. The alliance spans all activities from target discovery through to completion of proof of concept clinical

Full Post: MorphoSys and Galapagos enter alliance to co-develop novel therapeutic antibodies in bone and joint disease

Adding another reason for people to watch their blood pressure, a new study from North Carolina State University shows that increased blood pressure in older adults is directly related to decreased cognitive functioning, particularly among seniors with already high blood pressure.

This means that stressful situations may make it more difficult for some seniors to think clearly.

Dr. Jason Allaire, an assistant professor of psychology at NC State who co-authored the study, explains that study subjects whose average systolic blood pressure was 130 or higher saw a significant decrease in cognitive function when their blood pressure spiked. However, Allaire notes, study subjects whose average blood pressure was low or normal saw no change in their cognitive functioning - even when their blood pressure shot up.

Specifically, Allaire says, the study shows a link between blood pressure spikes in seniors with high blood pressure and a decrease in their inductive reasoning. “Inductive reasoning is important,” Allaire says, “because it is essentially the ability to work flexibly with unfamiliar information and find solutions.”

Allaire says the findings may indicate that mental stress is partially responsible for the increase in blood pressure - and the corresponding breakdown in cognitive functioning. However, Allaire notes that normal fluctuations in blood pressure likely play a role as well.

http://www.ncsu.edu/

Link




Sleeping less than seven and a half hours per day may be associated with future risk of heart disease, according to a report in the November 10 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine. In addition, a combination of little sleep and overnight elevated blood pressure appears to be associated with an increased risk of the

Full Post: Lack of sleep tied to greater risk of heart disease



Both the developing brain and the aging brain can suffer from lead exposure. For older people, a buildup of lead from earlier exposure may be enough to result in greater cognitive problems after age 55, according to a follow-up study of adults exposed to lead at work. A full report appears in the January issue

Full Post: Exposure to lead brings cognitive problems later in life



A French study reported in the 12th January issue of Archives of Internal Medicine has found a strong correlation between blood pressure and outdoor temperature in a large sample of the elderly.(1) As a result, the investigators advise that, during periods of extreme temperatures, careful monitoring of blood pressure and antihypertensive treatment “could contribute to

Full Post: Seasonal variation in blood pressure



Cold weather may raise blood pressure in elderly. In new research French are suggesting that elderly people may be more at risk of suffering a stroke, heart attack or kidney failure in winter because cold weather may raise their blood pressure. The researchers from the National Institute of Health and Medical Research in Paris say

Full Post: Elderly more at risk of heart attack in cold weather



Ninety-two percent of seniors enrolled in the Medicare Part D prescription drug benefit in 2008 are satisfied with their coverage according to a national phone survey by RetireSafe, a nationwide education and advocacy group for older Americans. The findings were not unexpected. Similar surveys conducted over the last year found the same results. “The universal

Full Post: Seniors happy with Medicare drug coverage just the way it is