Male breast cancer



Intravenous (i.v.) medication errors are twice as likely to cause harm to patients as medications delivered by other routes of administration (such as tablets or liquids), according to research commissioned by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP). This week, ASHP and leading healthcare organizations released recommended actions to prevent these potentially life-threatening events. The

Full Post: Healthcare leaders vow to stop intravenous medication errors

Mammography and sonography findings help doctors identify and appropriately treat breast cancer in men, according to a study performed at the University of Texas M.D. Cancer Center in Houston, TX.

Image findings from 57 male patients who were diagnosed with breast cancer were reviewed during the study. “The findings show that breast cancer in men most commonly presents itself as a mass with an irregular shape and spiculated (spiky or pointy) margins that may or may not have calcifications. Many men in the study, 47%, also had cancer which had spread to the armpit,” said Wei Tse Yang, MD, lead author of the study.

Male breast cancer accounts for less than 1% of all breast cancers and “a large number of men with breast cancer do not undergo imaging prior to treatment either because mammography is not heavily advertised in the male community or because men also may be socially conscious about that part of their anatomy,” said Dr. Yang. “Almost 100% of men with breast cancer have a lump they can feel. Men should consult their physician and seek treatment as early as possible when a new mass presents itself in the breast,” she said.

“Mammography and sonography are key to aiding primary care physicians with making a quick and accurate diagnosis. They allow for full interrogation of the involved breast and allow for screening of the opposite breast,” said Dr. Yang.

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Every day, women face a barrage of headlines about breast cancer. What should they do with all of that information? George Sledge, M.D., an internationally recognized breast cancer expert, pointed out that, despite all of the near-constant news and information about breast cancer, it is not the disease that impacts most women. “It’s important to

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The revelation that champion marathon runner Kerryn McCann did nothing for months after discovering a lump in her breast, is a stark warning to women to heed any changes they notice in their breasts and seek medical advice. According to the National Breast and Ovarian Cancer Centre (NBOCC), the dual Commonwealth marathon gold medallist and

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A dual-headed dedicated gamma camera used during molecular breast imaging (MBI) can accurately detect small breast tumors less than 2 cm in size, according to a study performed at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. One-hundred fifty patients who had suspicious lesions smaller than 2 cm in size were imaged using dual-head molecular breast imaging.

Full Post: Dual-headed dedicated gamma camera accurately detects small breast tumors



Computer programs designed to help radiologists could identify more cases of breast cancer, but they might also increase the number of false-positive results, which can lead to biopsies in healthy women, according to a recent systematic review. Using computer-aided detection (CAD) mammography, “you do catch some cases that would have been missed if the mammogram

Full Post: Computer-aided detection (CAD) mammography for breast cancer screening



Breast-Specific Gamma Imaging (BSGI) has been proven to be a highly sensitive imaging technique for the diagnosis of invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC), a difficult to diagnose breast cancer. BSGI is a molecular breast imaging technique that can see lesions independent of tissue density and discover very early stage cancers. When compared to mammography, ultrasound and

Full Post: Molecular breast imaging technique shows greater sensitivity over mammography, ultrasound and MRI for difficult to diagnose breast cancer