Mortality rates higher for heart disease patients in neighbourhoods with poor socioeconomics status



An Australian expert has warned that among the top ten hazards for people in Australia this summer the beach culture plays a big role. According to Professor Paul Barach from the Injury Risk Management Research Centre at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) the summer sun and surf provide fun and sport but also

Full Post: Sun and surf among top summer hazards for Australians

Heart disease patients living in poorer areas of B.C. are up to twice as likely to die from chronic diseases than patients living in better-off areas, a University of British Columbia study has found.

The research, released this week in the online journal Public Library of Science ONE , found coronary-artery disease patients living in lower socioeconomic neighbourhoods are more vulnerable to death from chronic disease, particularly cancer.

“Even in a country with universal healthcare services, a neighbourhood’s socioeconomic status can have a dramatic impact on life expectancy for patients with heart disease,” said study co-author Claire Heslop, a MD/PhD student in UBC’s Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine.

This trend may reflect the higher overall stress experienced by patients in low socioeconomic areas, the researchers explain in the Jan. 7 issue of the open access science journal. Heslop and UBC Prof. John Hill collaborated with Greg Miller, a researcher in UBC’s Department of Psychology, for the study.

Full paper: http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0004120

“These findings should prompt a new examination of neighbourhood effects on health, and how they could be improved to better the lives of residents,” Heslop said.

Using mapping data provided by the Human Early Learning Partnership at UBC, researchers studied 485 patients with heart disease across more than 13 years. Death rates from different types of diseases were compared to the patients’ neighbourhood data based on education, median family income and unemployment.

The authors found that patient death rates from chronic diseases other than heart disease were more than twice as high in the lowest socioeconomic area than in the highest. Surprisingly, no difference was found in deaths from heart disease across neighbourhoods.

Researchers have long demonstrated the role neighbourhood and individual socioeconomic trends play in heart disease patient mortality. In B.C., heart disease interventions are performed at centralized hospitals, so patients likely receive equal care regardless of where they live. However, they may suffer from disparities in overall health and health care related to their neighbourhood environment.

http://www.ubc.ca/

Link




Minority children awaiting a donor heart for transplant have a higher death rate than white children, even after controlling for clinical risk factors, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2008. In a study conducted by researchers in Boston, waitlist mortality was 14 percent for white children, 19 percent for black,

Full Post: Racial disparities found in access and use of organ transplantation in children listed for heart transplant



A University of South Carolina study of children’s dental health has found that nearly one-fourth of the nation’s children have had no dental care in at least a year. Conducted by researchers at the S.C. Rural Health Research Center at the Arnold School of Public Health, the study found that nearly 32 percent of Hispanic

Full Post: 25% of U.S. kids received no dental care in at least one year



Coincident with the widespread adoption of PSA screening, the proportion of American men diagnosed with organ-confined, low risk prostate cancer has increased significantly during the last two decades. In a study scheduled for publication in the February 2009 issue of The Journal of Urology, researchers report that for low-income men, the opposite is true, with

Full Post: Low income men diagnosed more often with advanced prostate cancer



Ed Wagner, MD, MPH, knew there had to be a better way. He and Group Health colleagues set out 15 years ago to explore how best to engage patients with chronic diseases in effective care. With Robert Wood Johnson Foundation support, they developed the Chronic Care Model. More than 1,500 U.S. and international medical practices

Full Post: Caring for chronic diseases in a “fragmented” health care system



The temperature might not be the only thing plummeting this winter. Many people also will experience a decrease in their vitamin D levels, which can play a role in heart disease, according to a new review article in Circulation. Vitamin D deficiency results in part from reduced exposure to sunlight, which is common during cold

Full Post: Vitamin D deficiency may be a culprit in heart disease, high blood pressure and metabolic syndrome