New colorectal module from Simbionix advances laparoscopic cancer treatment



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Simbionix USA Corp, an international company using leading edge simulation to advance clinical performance, announces the world-wide release of a breakthrough training simulation of the laparoscopic colorectal procedure.

Although minimally invasive surgical (MIS) techniques provide many advantages over traditional open surgery, surgeons have been slow to adopt laparoscopic colon resection, because it is a very challenging procedure to learn without potentially putting patients at risk. Colorectal resection is the most common treatment for colorectal cancer, which accounts for almost 10% of all cancer deaths in the US annually. The US National Institutes of Health (NIH) ranks colorectal cancer as the 4th most common type in the United States, with over 148,000 Americans diagnosed in 2008.

This new, virtual reality simulation, properly used, will significantly assist surgeons in mastering and perfecting their skills, in performing this critical cancer procedure, without posing a risk to patients during the learning process. The Laparoscopic Colorectal Procedure simulation joins the suite of training simulations available on Simbionix’s critically acclaimed LAP Mentor(TM) which now offers training opportunities on seven different laparoscopic procedures and over 60 different patient scenarios.

“Our new laparoscopic colorectal module is definitely a revolution in the world of virtual reality medical simulation,” explains Simbionix President, Ran Bronstein. “We’ve created a virtual 3D environment featuring the complex anatomical structures a surgeon would encounter in a real laparoscopic colorectal resection. Combined with the unique simulation capabilities that I believe only Simbionix can provide, the virtual module allows unlimited procedural interaction and is a definite leap forward in medical simulation.”

The Simbionix Laparoscopic Colorectal Procedure simulation received international praise at the September 2008, 11th World Congress of Endoscopic Surgery and the Japanese Society of Endoscopic Surgery (JSES), and at the American College of Surgery (ACS) in San Francisco, CA in October. Professor Watanabe, head of the JSES, said: “It is very exciting to have a way of training how to perform and master this critical procedure. I am sure we will use it to train our surgeons.”

Conor P. Delaney, Professor of Surgery, Chief, Division of Colorectal Surgery at Case Western Reserve University, is also excited about the new module. “The laparoscopic colorectal module will transform the way we teach laparoscopic colorectal surgery. I see this as an important part of training, where trainees learn the basic steps on a simple trainer, and then practice their first 20 cases on the Simbionix simulator. That way, by the time they need to perform in a clinical situation, they are already experienced with the procedure.”

Simbionix is a global leader in medical simulation technology. Simbionix mission is to provide state of the art, computer-assisted metrics-based surgical simulation systems, and set the standard for minimally invasive surgical training and performance.

Simbionix products provide medical experts with hands-on training in a comprehensive array of MIS procedures, including; GI Endoscopy, Endourology, percutaneous access, advanced laparoscopic procedures and Endovascular procedures.

http://www.simbionix.com

 

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