New drug tasimelteon may cure jet lag



Total knee replacement (TKR) is a common treatment for osteoarthritis, a disease affecting more than 20 million Americans. However, the surgery poses risks and both patients and physicians must carefully assess its potential benefits and harm. Studies have shown that doctor-patient communication is correlated with outcomes and that patient satisfaction and commitment to treatment are

Full Post: Health-care providers and patients differ on views of knee replacement

A team of researchers from Monash University, The Brigham and Women’s Hospital (Boston), Harvard Medical School and Vanda Pharmaceuticals has found a new drug with the potential to alleviate jet lag and sleep disorders caused by shift work.

Dr Shantha Rajaratnam from Monash University’s School of Psychology, Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine said tasimelteon, a drug which acts on melatonin receptors in the brain, could be a highly effective treatment for circadian rhythm sleep disorders.

The research was released today in respected publication, The Lancet.

“Our studies show that tasimelteon is able to effectively shift the rhythm of melatonin levels in the body, which are a well-established marker of the human biological clock,” Dr Rajaratnam said.

“This drug has the potential to improve the quality and quantity of sleep for patients with transient insomnia caused by jet lag.

“Tasimelteon improved a patient’s ability to fall asleep and then stay asleep when bedtime was shifted earlier by five hours.

“This is the equivalent of travelling eastwards and putting your clock back five hours, such as returning from India to Melbourne, or Dubai to Perth.

“About two thirds of all international travellers who cross time zones experience jet lag symptoms, which include disruption of sleep, difficulty getting to and staying asleep, sleepiness during waking hours and gastrointestinal symptoms.”

He said the drug could also help those who work at night or early in the morning.

“An estimated one in five work outside the regular nine-to-five pattern. In the United states alone it is estimated 19.7 million people start work between 2.30 and 7 am,” Dr Rajaratnam said.

“Our work has shown the drug to be highly potent, having the strongest effect when first taken; a single dose treatment was found to be effective for this type of sleep disturbance.”

The drug is in the later stages of trials and must undergo rigorous testing before being made available to consumers.

http://www.monash.edu.au/

Link




An experimental drug developed by Australian scientists could offer a new cure for jet lag and be a welcome alternative to addictive sedatives such as benzodiazepines. The scientists from Monash University’s School of Psychology, Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine led by Dr. Shantha Rajaratnam, say the new drug Tasimelteon works by shifting the natural ebb and

Full Post: New sleeping pill could be the answer to jet lag



Individuals who get less than seven hours of sleep per night appear about three times as likely to develop respiratory illness following exposure to a cold virus as those who sleep eight hours or more, according to a report in the January 12 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine. Studies have demonstrated that sleep deprivation

Full Post: Less than seven hours of sleep may mean more colds



Between the ages of six months and six years old, close to 90 percent of children have at least one sleep-related problem. Among the most common issues are night terrors, teeth-grinding and bed-wetting. For the majority, it’s simply a stage that passes. But at least 30 percent of children in this age group have difficulties

Full Post: Many sleepless children become overweight



The immune system’s battle against invading bacteria reaches its peak activity at night and is lowest during the day. Experiments with the laboratory model organism, Drosophila melanogaster, reveal that the specific immune response known as phagocytosis oscillates with the body’s circadian rhythm, according to Stanford researchers who presented their findings at the American Society for

Full Post: Research suggests that immunity is stronger at night



Indulgence in a high-fat diet can not only lead to overweight because of excessive calorie intake, but also can affect the balance of circadian rhythms - everyone’s 24-hour biological clock, Hebrew University of Jerusalem researchers have shown. The biological clock regulates the expression and/or activity of enzymes and hormones involved in metabolism, and disturbance

Full Post: High-fat diet can disrupt our biological clock