New scan shows bleeding inside heart after heart attack



An ointment made from indigo naturalis, a dark blue plant-based powder used in traditional Chinese medicine, appears effective in treating plaque-type psoriasis, according to a report in the November issue of Archives of Dermatology. Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease for which no cure exists, only therapies that bring it into remission, according to background

Full Post: Ointment made from indigo naturalis may help treat psoriasis

Images that for the first time show bleeding inside the heart after people have suffered a heart attack have been captured by scientists, in a new study published today in the journal Radiology.

The research shows that the amount of bleeding can indicate how damaged a person’s heart is after a heart attack. The researchers, from the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre at Imperial College London, hope that this kind of imaging will be used alongside other tests to create a fuller picture of a patient’s condition and their chances of recovery.

The research was funded by the Medical Research Council, the British Heart Foundation and the Department of Health, UK.

People suffer heart attacks when an artery that feeds blood to the heart becomes blocked, stopping the heart’s blood supply and depriving the heart muscle of oxygen. Currently, most people treated for a heart attack are fitted with a metal tube called a stent to keep the blocked artery clear.

Recent research has shown that some people experience bleeding inside the heart muscle once blood starts to pump into it again. However, the significance of this bleeding is currently not understood.

For the new small study, the researchers captured images of bleeding inside the heart in 15 patients from Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust who had recently suffered a heart attack, using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Analysis of the MRI scans revealed that the amount of bleeding correlated with how much damage the heart muscle had sustained.

Patients who had suffered a large heart attack, where a lot of the heart muscle was damaged, had a lot of bleeding into the heart muscle compared with those whose heart attack was relatively small.

The researchers were able to detect the area of bleeding because of the magnetic effects of iron, which is present in the blood.

Dr Declan O’Regan, the first and corresponding author of the study from the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre at Imperial College London, said: “Our study gives us a new insight into the damage that heart attacks can cause. Using this new scanning technique shows us that patients who develop bleeding inside their damaged heart muscle have a much poorer chance of recovery. We hope that this will help us to identify which patients are at most risk of complications following their heart attack”

Dr Stuart Cook, the study’s senior author from the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre at Imperial College London, added: “We still have a lot of unanswered questions about whether the bleeding itself may cause further damage to the heart muscle and this is an area that needs further research. The more we understand about what happens during and after a heart attack, the greater the chances are of scientists finding new ways to combat the damage that heart attacks cause.”

http://www.imperial.ac.uk/

Link




Researchers at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC have been able to effectively repair damaged heart muscle in an animal model using a novel population of stem cells they discovered that is derived from human skeletal muscle tissue. The research team - led by Johnny Huard, PhD - transplanted stem cells purified from human muscle-derived

Full Post: Researchers repair injured heart muscle with novel stem cells



Exciting research into blood clotting by British Heart Foundation (BHF) researchers working at the University of Bristol will take us a step closer to better heart attack prevention and treatment. Blood clots can be both life-saving and life-threatening; life-saving when they stop bleeding, but life-threatening when they form in diseased arteries feeding the heart.

Full Post: New clot-buster found



Despite substantial progress in the diagnosis and treatment of heart attack patients, prevention of recurrent heart attacks continues to be a major clinical challenge. A new study showed that patients who suffered a non-fatal heart attack within the first three months of hospitalization for chest pain had a significantly higher risk for dying or having

Full Post: Heart attack prevention within three months after hospitalization significantly averted future attacks



People from black and south Asian communities in the UK are not benefiting as much as white people from doctors’ interventions to reduce their blood pressure, according to a new study published today in the journal Annals of Family Medicine. The study looked at the treatment of over 8,800 people with high blood pressure, visiting

Full Post: Black and south Asian people benefiting less from interventions to reduce blood pressure



A new £1m clinical research facility dedicated to tackling liver disease, the fifth most common cause of death in the UK, opens today at Imperial College London. Liver disease death rates are rising in the UK, in contrast to other common diseases such as heart disease and cancer, and the new Robert Hesketh Hepatology Clinical

Full Post: Liver disease tackled with dedicated unit at Imperial College London