New technique to study the genetics of breast cancer



The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Gleevec (imatinib mesylate) for a new indication - keeping cancer from growing in patients following surgical removal of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor or GIST. GIST is a fairly rare form of cancer that originates in cells found in the wall of the GI tract. These cells, known as

Full Post: FDA approves Gleevec (imatinib mesylate) to prevent gastrointestinal stromal tumor

A new technique to study genetic changes that can lead to breast cancer could be one step closer.

The University of Nottingham has received £15,000 from the charity Breast Cancer Campaign to fill in one of the research gaps identified by the country’s top breast cancer experts in a recent study carried out by the charity. The aim is to identify the many undiscovered genes thought to be involved in the early stages of breast cancer.

The grant awarded to Ian Ellis, Professor of Cancer Pathology, is part of £2.3 million awarded to 20 projects around the UK. Professor Ellis said: “Thanks to funding from Breast Cancer Campaign I hope to develop a technique which would allow the genetic information of many thousands of breast samples to be studied which would be of huge importance in understanding the genetic changes that occur in early breast cancer.”

It is known that breast cancer can develop when the genes in breast cells change and stop working properly. Inherited defects in genes account for around five to 10 per cent of all breast cancers but all forms of breast cancer have acquired gene defects during their initial stages of development and many of these genes are yet to be discovered. These defective genes can lead to physical changes in the breast cancer cell resulting in breast cancer.

The earliest physical sign of a normal breast cell developing into one common type of breast cancer is the presence of a flat atypical epithelial (FEA) cell. Professor Ellis will study the genes in the FEA cells to identify which ones are involved in the very earliest stages of breast cancer.

Pamela Goldberg, Chief Executive, Breast Cancer Campaign, said, “Every year breast cancer kills 12,500 women in the UK. It is therefore vital that we identify new genes involved in breast cancer development so that women who inherit these faulty genes and are therefore at higher risk of breast cancer, can be monitored at an early stage.”

http://www.nottingham.ac.uk

Link




A new study reveals that the metadherin gene (MTDH) plays a role in both cancer metastasis and resistance to chemotherapy. The research, published by Cell Press in the January 6th issue of the journal Cancer Cell , identifies MTDH as a promising therapeutic target for high risk breast cancers. “Most breast cancer patients resist currently

Full Post: Metadherin gene plays dual role in breast cancers with poor prognosis



A study led by researchers at The University of Nottingham has identified a gene that protects the body from lung cancer. The research, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA and funded by a £72,000 grant from the British Lung Foundation, has found that the tumour suppressor gene, LIMD1, is

Full Post: Discovery of gene that protects against lung cancer



An intra cellular pathway not previously linked to breast cancer is driving a sub-type of the disease that is highly lethal and disproportionately over-represented in African American women. The pathway regulates how cells identify and destroy proteins and represents a class of genes called proteasome targeting complexes. The work shows that basal cancer cells degrade

Full Post: Scientists find intra cellular pathway driving a deadly sub-type of breast cancer



Mammography and sonography findings help doctors identify and appropriately treat breast cancer in men, according to a study performed at the University of Texas M.D. Cancer Center in Houston, TX. Image findings from 57 male patients who were diagnosed with breast cancer were reviewed during the study. “The findings show that breast cancer in men

Full Post: Male breast cancer



An international team of researchers, which included scientists from the University of Queensland, have generated an atlas of genes involved in kidney formation. This first comprehensive genetic blueprint of a developing mammal organ, will throw light on the genetic and molecular dynamics of kidney formation and help scientists understand how developmental abnormalities occur and how

Full Post: New genetic kidney atlas will explain kidney disease