Researchers discover how red wine may reduce Alzheimer’s



Researchers hope to achieve healthy ageing by enhancing body healing capacity and reducing chronic inflammation. Why does wound-healing deteriorate with advanced age?  This issue will be addressed thanks to a research grant of nearly ?11 million from the European Commission (EC). Paolo Madeddu, Professor of Experimental Cardiovascluar Medicine at the Bristol Heart Institute, is a

Full Post: Scientists hope European grant can improve healthy ageing

Scientists call it the “French paradox” - a society that, despite consuming food high in cholesterol and saturated fats, has long had low death rates from heart disease.

Research has suggested it is the red wine consumed with all that fatty food that may be beneficial - and not only for cardiovascular health but in warding off certain tumors and even Alzheimer’s disease.

Now, Alzheimer’s researchers at UCLA, in collaboration with Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in New York, have discovered how red wine may reduce the incidence of the disease. Reporting in the Nov. 21 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, David Teplow, a UCLA professor of neurology, and colleagues show how naturally occurring compounds in red wine called polyphenols block the formation of proteins that build the toxic plaques thought to destroy brain cells, and further, how they reduce the toxicity of existing plaques, thus reducing cognitive deterioration.

Polyphenols comprise a chemical class with more than 8,000 members, many of which are found in high concentrations in wine, tea, nuts, berries, cocoa and various plants. Past research has suggested that such polyphenols may inhibit or prevent the buildup of toxic fibers composed primarily of two proteins - Aβ40 and Aβ42 - that deposit in the brain and form the plaques which have long been associated with Alzheimer’s. Until now, however, no one understood the mechanics of how polyphenols worked.

Teplow’s lab has been studying how amyloid beta (Aβ) is involved in causing Alzheimer’s. In this work, researchers monitored how Aβ40 and Aβ42 proteins folded up and stuck to each other to produce aggregates that killed nerve cells in mice. They then treated the proteins with a polyphenol compound extracted from grape seeds. They discovered that polyphenols carried a one-two punch: They blocked the formation of the toxic aggregates of Aβ and also decreased toxicity when they were combined with Aβ before it was added to brain cells.

“What we found is pretty straightforward,” Teplow said. “If the Aβ proteins can’t assemble, toxic aggregates can’t form, and thus there is no toxicity. Our work in the laboratory, and Mt. Sinai’s Dr. Giulio Pasinetti’s work in mice, suggest that administration of the compound to Alzheimer’s patients might block the development of these toxic aggregates, prevent disease development and also ameliorate existing disease.”

Human clinical trials are next.

“No disease-modifying treatments of Alzheimer’s now exist, and initial clinical trials of a number of different candidate drugs have been disappointing,” Teplow said. “So we believe that this is an important next step.”

http://www.ucla.edu/

Link




A drug commonly used to treat epilepsy could help clear the plaques in the brain associated with Alzheimer’s disease, according to researchers at the University of Leeds. The plaques are known to lead to the progressive death of nerve cells in the brain linked to many forms of dementia. Sodium valproate - which is marketed

Full Post: Anti-seizure drug Epilim shows promise for Alzheimer’s



A new study will provide comfort to white wine lovers and give them a good excuse to pour themselves a glass of Sauvignon blanc because it now appears that white wine is just as healthy for the heart as red. Scientists in the U.S. compared the cardioprotective abilities of red wine, white wine, and their

Full Post: White wine as healthy for the heart as red



Australian scientists are suggesting that grape seeds may be a potential treatment in warding off Alzheimer’s disease. The scientists at Flinders University have found that adding grape seed extract to the diet prevented the formation of deposits of amyloid proteins in the brain. The discovery was made by a team of medical scientists in the

Full Post: Grape seeds could ward off Alzheimer’s



UCLA scientists have used innovative brain-scan technology developed at UCLA, along with patient-specific information on Alzheimer’s disease risk, to help diagnose brain aging, often before symptoms appear. Published in the January issue of Archives of General Psychiatry, their study may offer a more accurate method for tracking brain aging. Researchers used positron emission tomography (PET),

Full Post: Innovative brain-scan technology helps visualize brain aging before symptoms appear



Individuals with higher education levels appear to score higher on cognitive tests despite having evidence of brain plaques associated with Alzheimer’s disease, according to a report in the November issue of Archives of Neurology. The cognitive reserve hypothesis holds that individuals with greater cognitive (thinking, learning and memory) abilities are able to delay symptoms of

Full Post: Greater thinking, learning and memory abilities delay symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease