Study examines medical cost increases for individuals living with diabetes



A study in the Jan. 1 issue of the journal Sleep demonstrates that the frequent arousals from sleep that occur in heart failure patients with central sleep apnea (CSA) may reflect the presence of another underlying arousal disorder rather than being a defensive mechanism to terminate apneas. Principal investigator, Douglas Bradley, professor of medicine at

Full Post: Arousal frequency in heart failure found to be a unique sleep problem

People diagnosed with diabetes spend over $4,100 more each year on medical costs than people who don’t have diabetes, a gap that increases substantially each year following the initial diagnosis, according to a study published online today in the journal Diabetes Care.

In the first study to examine medical cost increases for individuals living with diabetes on a year-by-year basis, researchers at RTI International, an independent, nonprofit research institute based in North Carolina, calculated that a 50-year-old newly diagnosed with diabetes spends $4,174 more on medical care per year than a person the same age who doesn’t have diabetes. For the person with diabetes, medical costs go up an additional $158 per year every year thereafter, over and above the amount they would increase due to aging-related increases in medical expenses.

Most of the increase can be attributed to the cost of diabetes-related complications, such as heart and kidney disease, the researchers found. Once they controlled for complications, the remaining annual increase in medical costs was $75 per year - the bulk of which could be attributed to the increasing need for diabetes medications the longer a person lives with the disease.

“The good news is that many of these costs could be contained through proper diabetes management and lifestyle changes,” said lead researcher Justin Trogdon, Research Economist. “Numerous studies show that losing weight and increasing physical activity, along with maintaining proper blood glucose levels, can substantially delay or reduce the risk for diabetes-related complications. What our study does is to point out that there is also a cumulative, financial impact to the progression of this disease.”

Preventing the onset of diabetes would also help to reduce cumulative costs, since medical expenditures grow along with the duration of the disease, the researchers concluded. “Delaying the development of diabetes will delay the steady rise in medical expenditures that accompanies it,” they wrote.

The study was funded by a grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To obtain a copy of the study, please contact Colleen Fogarty at cfogarty@diabetes.org.

To reach lead researcher Justin Trogdon, PhD, RTI International, Public Health Economics Program, email: jtrogdon@rti.org or phone: 919-541-6893.

The American Diabetes Association publishes a comprehensive report on the total economic impact of diabetes in the United States. To obtain a copy of the ADA’s most recent cost of diabetes study, published January 2008, visit: http://care.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/content/full/31/3/596.

http://www.diabetes.org

Link




People with substance abuse disorders cost Medicaid hundreds of millions of dollars annually in medical care, suggesting that early interventions for substance abuse could not only improve outcomes but also save substantial amounts of money, according to a comprehensive study that examined records of nearly 150,000 people in six states. “Substance abuse probably costs Medicaid

Full Post: The impact of substance use disorders on medical expenditures for Medicaid beneficiaries with behavioral health disorders



Minimally invasive endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) has been praised by many vascular surgeons and patients due to its benefits: shorter operating time, reduced hospital stays, faster recovery and less scarring. It is performed through two small groin incisions rather than a large, full-length abdominal incision used in open repair. Also, EVAR is often

Full Post: Study looks at endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair



Based on projected increases in the prevalence of diabetes, the number of people with diabetes-related retinal disease, with glaucoma and with cataracts is estimated to increase significantly by 2050, according to a report in the December issue of Archives of Ophthalmology. Diabetic retinopathy (damage to the small blood vessels in the retina) is the leading

Full Post: Cases of major eye disease projected to increase among diabetics



A study in the Jan. 1 issue of the journal Sleep indicates that the indirect costs of untreated insomnia are significantly greater than the direct costs associated with its treatment. The study estimates that the total annual cost of insomnia in the province of Quebec is 6.5 billion Canadian dollars, representing about one percent of

Full Post: Social and economic burden of insomnia is high



A study of people living with the devastating effects of multiple sclerosis (MS) has shown the true economic cost of living with the incurable, life-long condition. The independent research is one of the largest ever studies into the financial impact of MS and has revealed that the cost of being diagnosed with MS is on

Full Post: Study shows true economic cost of living with multiple sclerosis